Shepherd’s or Cottage Pies

Shepherd’s or Cottage Pies

Are you a Shepherd or a Cottager?

Shepherds eat lamb and cottagers eat beef.  Well, at least those are the kinds of pies named after them.  We make this recipe with either lamb or beef, depending on what’s on hand.  The votes are split 50/50 as to which is best.  I am a beef kind of girl  (which is funny for a ‘sheep farmer’).  Liam loves anything made with lamb.  (Thus, the sheep on the farm.)

The round tower at St. Declan’s Oratory in Ardmore, County Waterford.

  We had shepherd’s pie at a fantastic little pub in Ardmore, County Waterford.  Ardmore is a small town, but it has some breathtaking historical sites and the beach is a great sight itself!  In case you are wondering, yes I do tend to travel meal to meal.  I am one of those people who posts outstanding vacation meals on Facebook, and describes amazing towns as “the place we had the world’s best seafood chowder”!

St. Declan’s Well in Ardmore, County Waterford. The Christians bless themselves with the holy water. The pagans pour water on the ground to appease the fairies. My good Protestant husband did both!

I’ve collected recipes from every trip we’ve taken.  I got a terrific molé negro recipe from a tiny Zapoteca grandmother, who didn’t quite reach my chin, in Oaxaca, Mexico.  The most amazing scone recipe came from the best (Grandparent run) B & B in County Clare, Ireland.  This meat pie recipe is an amalgamation of recipes I picked up in different locations around Ireland.  However, there’s some weird connection in my brain that links Shepherd’s pie with Ardmore.  So, today I thought I would share the recipe and a few glimpses of Ardmore, County Waterford.

The cliffs on the walk near Ardmore Bay.

I hope you’ll give the recipe a try!  The root vegetables give a slight sweetness that balances the savory nicely.  The thick rich filling is complemented by the fluffy mashed potatoes.  All in all, I think it’s a lovely dish!

The beach near a pub with amazing shepherd’s pie in Ardmore, County Waterford.

Shephard's or Cottage Pies
Print Recipe
Shepherds eat lamb, and cottagers eat beef. We've made it both ways, and the family is torn on which is best! However, we all agree that it's delicious. Rich meaty filling meets fluffy mashed potatoes. The only thing that could make it better would be bacon, but Rashers Pie sounds a little odd! 😉
Servings Prep Time
1 9 x 13 pan 20 Minutes
Cook Time
1 1/4 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 9 x 13 pan 20 Minutes
Cook Time
1 1/4 Hours
Shephard's or Cottage Pies
Print Recipe
Shepherds eat lamb, and cottagers eat beef. We've made it both ways, and the family is torn on which is best! However, we all agree that it's delicious. Rich meaty filling meets fluffy mashed potatoes. The only thing that could make it better would be bacon, but Rashers Pie sounds a little odd! 😉
Servings Prep Time
1 9 x 13 pan 20 Minutes
Cook Time
1 1/4 Hours
Servings Prep Time
1 9 x 13 pan 20 Minutes
Cook Time
1 1/4 Hours
Ingredients
Meat and Vegetable Filling
Mashed Potatoes
Servings: 9 x 13 pan
Instructions
  1. Boil potatoes as for mashed potatoes. As they boil, brown the ground meat.
  2. Remove the ground meat to a colander to drain. Add oil, rutabega, carrots, onions, and parsnips to pan. Sautee until beginning to soften (about 10 minutes).
  3. Add meat, broth, tomato paste, worchestershire, herbs and seasoning to pan and gently mix well.
  4. Place filling in a greased 9 x 13 pan. Top with cheese if using.
  5. When potatoes are soft, preheat oven to 350`. Add milk/cream, butter, salt, parsley, and cheese (if using) to potatoes and mash thoroughly.
  6. Top meat filling with mashed potatoes. Using the tines of a fork, decorate the top. Either spray with oil or GENTLY brush with melted butter.
  7. Bake at 350` for 45 minutes.
Recipe Notes

I really think the root vegetables make this dish.  They add a hint of natural sweetness.  However, peas and carrots are most common in England and the US.  Our family isn't a big fan of English peas, so we choose to omit those.  As usual, feel free to toss in whatever you prefer or have on hand!  I hope you enjoy the dish!

Share this Recipe

Part of St. Declan’s Oratory in Ardmore. I can’t remember which building this is for certain, but I think it is the monk’s living quarters.

NOTE:  St. Declan was an early Irish saint.  He died somewhere around the fifth century and is thought to have preceded St. Patrick.  So, perhaps, we should be making great Irish food for St. Declan’s Day.  I cannot remember where I heard it, so if someone knows, please let me know and I’d love to give credit.  But, I love the quip, “St. Declan got to Ireland first, but Patrick had a better press agent!”

This, I believe, is the actual oratory at St. Declan’s complex in Ardmore.

 

 

About Anne in the Kitchen

Page with Comments

Please leave a comment! It makes my day to hear from y'all!

%d bloggers like this: